2013 Grantees

Supriya Baily
“Navigating and Exercising Power at the Local Level for Elected Female Officials”

Susan Hirsch
“Perspectives in the Pursuit of Global Justice: A Case Study of the World Justice Project”
 

Richard Medina
“Toward a Unified Understanding of International Terrorism: The Geography of a Definition”
 

Agnieszka Paczynska
“Globalizing Reconstruction: Emerging Powers and Post-Conflict Peacebuilding”

Kristien Zenkov & Anthony Pellegrino
“Picturing a ‘Global’ Citizen: Photo Elicitation and Youths’ Notions of Civic Leadership in the US, Haiti, and Iraq”
 

 

Project Descriptions

Supriya Baily
Assistant Professor
College of Education & Human Development
“Navigating and exercising power at the local level for elected female officials”
This project seeks to understand the ways in which female elected officials in India perceive of their power and impact of their agency on the people with whom they interact and represent.  My methodology is framed around critical theory perspectives, in an effort to grasp the immediacy of the social environment, while simultaneously analyzing the social relations within that space and time.  The findings should explore the ways in which local women leaders place their experiences and insights within the context of establishing, navigating and exercising power in situations that otherwise might be challenging. 

 

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Susan Hirsch
Associate Professor
School of Conflict Analysis & Resolution
“Shifting Perspectives in the Pursuit of Global Justice: A Case Study of the World Justice Project”
This project explores the efforts by the American-based World Justice Project (WJP) to promote justice for everyone globally through development of its Rule of Law Index and community based justice initiatives. This case study is intended to contribute to theories of how significant ideas and practices related to justice circulate globally, including their impact on individuals in the targeted communities and in the donor organization.

 

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Richard Medina
Assistant Professor
Geography & Geoinformation Service
“Toward a Unified Understanding of International Terrorism: The Geography of a Definition”
One of the greatest problems with combating terrorism on an international scale is this lack of an internationally, and in some cases intranationally, recognized, unified, definition of terrorism. This leads to mismatched labeling of terrorists and terrorist actions, as well as complications with respect to policies and punishments. This research will work to provide a greater understanding of national perceptions of terrorism throughout the world and identify potential steps to help unite them in their approaches and policies.

 

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Agnieszka Paczynska
Associate Professor/Undergraduate Program Director
School for Conflict Analysis & Resolution
“Globalizing Reconstruction: Emerging Powers and Post-Conflict Peacebuilding”
This project examines the growing role of emerging powers in post-conflict states, focusing in particular on intervention strategies of these powers and the their impact on political, economic and social dynamics of countries emerging out of civil war. The project explores these issues in the context of Liberia where assistance from emerging donors has significantly grown in recent years. 

 

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Kristien Zenkov
Associate Professor
College of Education  & Human Development

Anthony Pellegrino
Assistant Professor
College of Education  & Human Development
“Picturing a “Global” Citizen: Photo Elicitation and Youths’ Notions of Civic Leadership in the US, Haiti, and Iraq”
Distinct as they are, the US, Haiti, and Iraq are joined by questions of the very future of their political institutions and the definitions of citizenship, civic leadership, and social transformation by which these institutions are influenced. While it is perhaps young adults who best recognize the tensions between the notions of citizenship declared by their political powers, the realities of ordinary society members, and the highest democratic ideals, the young represent the demographic segment whose ideas are most consistently disregarded. We hypothesize that understanding notions of global citizenship can stimulate Iraqi, Haitian, and American youths’ engagement with their own nations’ and international forms of civic and political processes. “Picturing a ‘Global’ Citizen” will utilize photo elicitation methods to explore youths’ ideas about citizenship in these three contexts and, through analyses of participants’ images and writings, offer important insights into the notion of “global citizenship.”